2021 (1)
Digital Arts and Culture: Transformation or Transgression?

Constance DeVereaux / Steffen Höhne / Martin Tröndle / Marjo Mäenpää (Eds.)

209 Pages

ISBN 978-3-8376-5389-2

transcript

44,99€

The current issue can be ordered from the publisher.

The Journal of Cultural Management and Cultural Policy is dedicated to international perspectives that address a wide range of issues in cultural management and cultural policy research and practice. We invite articles that reflect on organizational structures of creative enterprises, economic and managerial issues in the arts, cultural policy in all its dimensions, as well as creative and aesthetic processes in cultural production, distribution and perception.

Introduction
Digital Arts and Culture: Transformation or Transgression?

This issue examines the effects digitization and digitalization have had on discourses, research designs, and processes of artistic production, distribution, and reception. Dealing with digital phenomena reconfigures social patterns of action, thinking, and organization in the arts and cultural sectors. These sectors are changing profoundly and rapidly, and with them their networks, audiences, the conditions of work and consumption. These issues are particularly acute during the ongoing COVID 19-pandemic with serious effects on the arts and cultural fields, showing the possibilities, but also the limits, of digitalization and digitization in the cultural sector. The authors discuss the challenges and opportunities digitalization and digitization imply for cultural management and cultural policy.

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Table of Contents
  • Digitization and Digitalization – Where We Come From

    Marjo Mäenpää in conversation with Jaakko Suominen

    Editorial

    Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0101

    • Abstract

      Digitalization offers new possibilities for cultural institutions but also challenges existing models. Looking at art institutions and their role as distributors and preservers of culture, this essay uses infrastructure theory and four case studies to discuss challenges that analog institutions face when they are dealing with digital art. The issues identified relate to resources, technical and financial, and knowledge about technological needs. The study also indicates that we hold on to old infrastructures and habits when it comes to preservation and distribution, but also when it comes to what an institution is and what it can be. Changing these habits takes time since they are often embedded in other systems. This suggests that the challenges institutions face in the cases of digital art are part of a larger infrastructural problem, which includes systems for funding, distribution of knowledge, educational programs, and habits.

    Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0102

    • Abstract

      Digital technology is increasingly used in museums for collaboration and exchange of ideas among organizations. This paper explores how co-creating digital biographies of displaced objects can unpack the multilayered meanings and values that were imparted on these objects by the sociocultural contexts they encountered. Previous research has shown that the biography of a displaced object allows us to understand what it had experienced through its movements and encounters with social contexts; importantly, the construction and study of object biographies illuminates these social contexts themselves and, in doing so, improves intercultural understanding. Drawing on theories and previous research in cross-disciplinary areas including material culture and digitization, this paper examines the complex cultural identities of displaced objects and explores how co-creating their digital biographies empowers different organizations and communities to exchange knowledge and negotiate interpretations. 

    Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0103

  • Essay
    • Abstract

      This essay analyses how the digital transformation is influencing the marketing communication measures used by arts and cultural organizations. Media use has shifted towards the online sphere; at the same time, overstimulation of the senses by advertisements provokes insecurities regarding product choice. As a consequence, consumers often base purchase decisions on online referrals. Since the offerings of the arts and cultural sector cannot generally be tested in advance, credible marketing communication presents difficulties. This essay applies the findings of relevant literature on referral marketing, particularly influencer marketing, to arts and cultural institutions. Influencer marketing can reduce uncertainties and aids customers in reaching decisions. Strategies, opportunities and risks are outlined to provide an overview of the marketing strategy. Two examples illustrate that opinions are divided regarding the growth in influencers who review art. 

    Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0104

  • Research Article
    • Abstract

      YouTube offers new possibilities for visual artists and DIY-musicians to increase their visibility. Applying a descriptive-exploratory approach, this paper identifies existing quality features: A comprehensive literature overview serves to extract and cluster quality features for YouTube. Two studies of 30 YouTube channels of visual artists and of 30 channels of DIY-musicians are used to test the identified quality features via content analysis. Qualitative expert interviews are used to validate and enrich the results for both art forms. For both groups of artists, the features technical quality, community building, target group orientation, connection to social media and appealing channel design are relevant. In addition, features were identified that are particularly important for either visual artists or DIY-musicians.

    Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0105

  • Performing Change
    Co-Creation in digital theater formats. A case study

    Christian Holst, Anne Aschenbrenner, Sebastian Huber

    Case Study
    • Abstract

      Digitality offers new opportunities for cultural production, which is suitable for supplementing and expanding purely supply-oriented cultural production. These include simple but comprehensive opportunities for co-creation, that is the active inclusion of external resources in the process of value creation. In the context of the closure of cultural institutions in spring 2020, due to the mitigation measures against the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic, some cultural institutions tested new digital ways and modes of cultural production. The article presents a qualitative experiment that was conducted at the Vienna Burgtheater that provides information about the potential and limits of co-creative cultural production in a theatre context.

    Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0106

  • Missing the Audience
    Online Musicking in Times of COVID-19

    Ties van de Werff, Neil Thomas Smith, Stefan Rosu, Peter Peters

    Case Study
    • Abstract

      The outbreak of COVID-19 has greatly impacted musicians and orchestras. While many orchestras had ample experience in producing and distributing their concerts online, others now had to experiment with new ways of performing online. But how to perform classical music without the rituals and routines of the concert hall? And what skills are required for musicians and orchestras to engage in online musicking? Based on our fieldwork during the experiment Online Musicking, which took place during the first lockdown in the Netherlands in 2020, we explicate the hidden work that goes into producing and distributing a collaborative classical music video, regarding performance qualities, audience participation, and societal relevance. The case of Online Musicking shows the challenges of shaping a digital offer for online audiences, and the value of experimentation for orchestras, which are finding new ways to produce and distribute their concerts online. 

    Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0107

    • Abstract

      The link between international cultural management and policy scholarship remains underdeveloped. This article addresses this gap. Based on a triangulation of textual analysis and interviews, it examines how culture is understood in Creative Europe (2014–2019; 2021–2027) and in the Strategy for International Cultural Relations (2016–). Firstly, it provides an overview of debates around the deployment of culture by the Union. Secondly, it examines changes in the term culture in the aforementioned programs. The analysis reveals that the EU’s recognition of the importance of culture within and beyond its borders is not accompanied by a univocal understanding of the term – leading to a dualistic regime of diversity management. Thirdly, it reflects on the challenges that are likely to emerge if – as is planned – Creative Europe funding is used to implement the International Cultural Relations strategy, and stresses the limits of ambiguity in the international management of cultural diversity.

    Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0108

  • Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0109

  • Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0110

  • Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0111

  • Journal of Cutural Management and Cultural Policy

    doi 10.14361/zkmm-2021-0112

Non-Visitor Studies and New Audiences

Guest Editors: tbd

Submission Deadline: 1 Sep, 2022

Intangible Cultural Heritage and Sustainable Development with a Special Focus on the Performing Arts

Guest Editors: Prof. Dr. Tiago de Oliveira Pinto, UNESCO Chair on Transcultural Music Studies, University of Music FRANZ ...

Submission Deadline: 1 Mar, 2023